Disruption is a scary word. And the landscape of the new Talent Economy is definitely a disruptive one: as a culture into which the newest – and largest – generation in the workforce has been born and raised, however, it is equally as dangerous to ignore it. Sarah Sladek argues that the refusal of some organizations to embrace the disruptive force of the Talent Economy has provoked a workforce crisis. In her new book,Talent Generation: How visionary organizations are redefining work and achieving greater success, she looks to the most successful organizations to define what they do differently in order to remain relevant and valuable in the contemporary world. She conducted extensive research to ascertain what makes some organizations so successful, while others really struggle in the face of disruption.

We interviewed Sarah to find out her main calls-to-action for organizations, based on this research. Below are the three key takeaways from the fascinating interview, including examples of some successful organizations and the behaviors or mindsets they share.

SUCCESSFUL ORGANIZATIONS PUT PEOPLE FIRST

“There’s a lot of emphasis right now on culture – on employee culture, on membership culture – and that if you have a great culture you will have engagement. But what we find is that it’s not just the perks, and it’s not just culture in and of itself. It’s truly organisations that put people first that are very successful today.”

YOU MUST BE FUTURE FOCUSED

“Here’s the thing. If you’re never really thinking about the future because the future’s happening faster than ever before, your organisation is quickly becoming irrelevant.”

COLLABORATION IS KEY

“When you’re forced to deal with a lot of change and disruption, what happens? You become very fearful. You become resistant. You try to hold onto those legacies and traditions and hold steadfast and wish for the good old days. Well, when you collaborate and build strong teams and communities and you begin to be in dialogue with different generations and different audiences, it opens your world. And you begin to feel a sense of peace, you’re reassured that you’re making the right decisions. And when you have that sense of peace, fear is eliminated, and it opens the door to innovation.”

Lucie has always been driven by teaching and learning. Masters degrees in philosophy and religious studies from Edinburgh and McGill Universities have proved to her the power of ideas, while two years building and growing a dedicated local membership for the children’s tuition centre she ran in South London was a lesson in turning shared ideas into an engaged and flourishing community.

Lucie has always been driven by teaching and learning. Masters degrees in philosophy and religious studies from Edinburgh and McGill Universities have proved to her the power of ideas, while two years building and growing a dedicated local membership for the children’s tuition centre she ran in South London was a lesson in turning shared ideas into an engaged and flourishing community.

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