Once a month, I’ll round up some links to posts from around the internet on our topic of the month. Here’s this month’s reading list on leadership development and culture. There is a lot on this subject all over the internet, but these picks have some newly relevant insights around leading from the middle, self-directed and team-directed development, and culture as a vehicle for continuous learning. See what you think.

Creating a Culture of Professional Development (Barbara Bates, PR News)

“Strong professional development allows companies to become a platform for talented employees to build their own expertise and do work that matters to them, both personally and professionally.

To build and support this success, companies need to focus on making professional development part of their culture. It affirms that they believe in their people; that they will prepare them for ever-increasing responsibilities and opportunities and that they are committed to developing the talent they’ve attracted through continuous improvement.

One key to successful professional development is letting it to be team-directed. A rigid professional development program in which employees don’t have any influence on the types of training they receive can feel a little bit like enforced recreation. Allow employees to have a say in how the professional development program is structured so they can be passionate and engaged participants.”

Developing Leadership Culture: Leadership is more than Leaders (Center for Creative Leadership)

“In the view being presented here, it is the leadership culture – not individual leaders – that is understood as the source of leadership. Individuals, no matter whether they might be formally recognized as leaders, are understood as enactors of and participants in the leadership culture. Thus, it is the nature of the leadership culture that determines what specific competencies of individuals will be effective in producing good leadership. For example, in some leadership cultures, influencing, negotiating, and collaborating might be the most important competencies that help individuals to create direction, alignment, and commitment. In others, competencies such as networking, flexibility, and focus on bottom-line goals might be most important. In the following, we will present two case studies of organizations with very different leadership cultures. “

10 Practical Insights to Improve Your Learning Culture (Big Think)

“Why do people work at a company like Google? Good salary. Check. Good benefits. Check. But it turns out that one of the most compelling reasons to work at Google is to learn. How many other companies can offer the kind of learning culture that attracts top talent? Not many.

Big Think hosted a recent event for learning and development leaders from the world’s most innovative organizations, and explored the common thread of challenges faced by organizations, large and small:

  • How can we develop learning programs that will result in better recruitment, retention, and employee satisfaction?
  • How can we convince key stakeholders that these programs will lead to company-wide success?
  • How do we secure the resources needed to implement these programs?”

How to Create a Learning Culture (SHRM)

“Corporate learning involves more than finding the right mix of classes and seminars; it’s about nurturing a mindset.

A learning culture consists of a community of workers instilled with a “growth mindset.” People not only want to learn and apply what they’ve learned to help their organization, they also feel compelled to share their knowledge with others. “

Maddie Grant is known for her experience as an expert digital strategist who has helped hundreds of organizations engage with their customer base and build capacity for using social media and online communities to achieve business results. Recognizing the transformative and human-centric power of social media early on, she helped organizations integrate social media into their culture authentically, rather than attempting to bolt it on a new process.

Maddie Grant is known for her experience as an expert digital strategist who has helped hundreds of organizations engage with their customer base and build capacity for using social media and online communities to achieve business results. Recognizing the transformative and human-centric power of social media early on, she helped organizations integrate social media into their culture authentically, rather than attempting to bolt it on a new process.

There's More To Discover

Subscribe today for more thought-provoking content.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.