Author: Jamie Notter

Jamie is an author and culture consultant at Human Workplaces who uses culture analytics and customized consulting to drive growth, innovation, and engagement for organizations around the world. He brings 25 years of experience in conflict resolution, generational differences and culture change to his work with leaders leveraging the power of culture. The author of two books — "When Millennials Take Over" and "Humanize" — Jamie has a Master’s in conflict resolution from George Mason and a certificate in OD from Georgetown, where he serves as adjunct faculty.

Jul
19

It’s time for national and local organizations to co-engage with members

For very many association members, ”engagement” includes experiences at the local level (frequently through a chapter/component), and at the national level, through the national association. There are obviously a lot of issues wrapped up in the national/component relationship, and I’m not attempting to address them all here. But I want to pull out an important […]

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Jul
11

What it means to be an association member is changing

In my post earlier this week, I pushed the issue of defining engagement. But the first half of the phrase “member engagement” could also use a little attention. We throw around the word “member” a lot, not acknowledging we have a lot of baggage that goes with it. Granted, we are membership organizations, so I […]

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Jul
05

How does your association define engagement?

Everyone in the association world cares about member engagement (or should, anyway). And a lot of people in the association world are actively trying to measure engagement and improve engagement. Which is fine, except for one problem: Very few people have actually defined engagement.  Maddie and I have done some long-term work with a couple […]

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Jun
29

Aligning individual employees with your culture

I have written a lot about the need to design our organizations around the needs of the employees. I see this as part of a digital mindset that we need to be adopting if we want our associations to thrive in the 21st century. The world has changed (permanently) and individuals expect us to run […]

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Jun
21

Why an experienced professional should think like a beginner

One of the fundamental truths in the business world is that experience is a good thing. When we want to hire someone for a job, we demand it. When we look back at our own careers, we realize that once we have it, we are better at many things than we were before we had […]

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Jun
15

Does your association’s culture support job rotations?

I’ve been in the association world for a long time, and I hear a lot of complaints about silos. The different departments, while necessary, also cause a lot of problems because they don’t collaborate well. The “culprit” will vary by organization — member services, education, meetings — but at some point one or more ends […]

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Jun
04

Why you should customize your staff’s development

We’ve all heard the cliches, like “our people are our greatest asset,” but when push comes to shove, with budgets for professional development internally, I’m not sure that’s always the case. It’s expensive to develop your people. It takes them away from the jobs they need to do, and there are frequently fees involved for […]

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May
26

Do boards destroy more value than they create?

We’ve been talking about the connection between association boards and culture, and most posts have been organized around concrete tips: The first set the stage on defining and maintaining a board culture, and then we got right into tips on orienting your board. Maddie interviewed AGU CEO Chris McEntee on some cool stuff she’s done with her […]

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May
20

3 conflict resolution tools for your board

In case you didn’t know, I got my Master’s degree in conflict analysis and resolution 20-odd years ago from George Mason University. I studied conflict from all angles with some of the leaders in the field, and I can tell you, from the theory side, there is absolute clarity that: Conflict is a good thing. […]

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May
12

3 reasons your volunteer ladder may be flawed

There is, of course, logic to this assumption. By requiring prior service, you provide an opportunity for the volunteer to learn how the system works and what it takes to be an effective board member. You also get a chance to evaluate their effectiveness as a board member; it’s a “minor league” of sorts. That […]

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